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The Literature, Medicine, and Culture Colloquium is an informal working group of graduate students (along with faculty, librarians, and a few undergrads) who meet monthly to talk about all things LMC. In the past, we’ve met to workshop conference papers or other works-in-progress, discuss shared readings, and review journal articles. LMCC is a growing, energized organization for grad students in English and beyond. Drawing on a diverse array of personal and disciplinary perspectives, LMCC participants explore medical narratives, popular and professional health discourses, and other topics in the health humanities.

For more information, explore this site including notes on past meetings, upcoming events, and useful resources. Stay up to date with our latest announcements and updates by subscribing by email.

If you’re interested in joining, please contact one of our Co-Directors: 

 

RECENT POSTS:

April 2021 Meeting Announcement

LMCC’s next meeting will take place Wednesday, April 28 at 5:30pm est! For our April meeting, we will be reading and discussing the introduction to Kyla Schuller’s 2018 monograph The Biopolitics of Feeling: Race, Sex, and Science in the Nineteenth Century. … Continued

March 2021: Hogarth’s Medicalizing Blackness

Our March, 2021 meeting of LMCC took place on Wed. March 31 at 5:30pm est via Zoom. We focused on Rana A. Hogarth’s Medicalizing Blackness: Making Racial Difference in the Atlantic World, 1780-1840, especially: Prologue Introduction An additional chapter of … Continued

March 2021 Meeting Announcement

LMCC’s next meeting will take place Wednesday, March 31 at 5:30pm est! For our March meeting, we will be reading and discussing the introduction to Rana A. Hogarth’s 2017 book Medicalizing Blackness: Making Racial Difference in the Atlantic World, 1780-1840. In … Continued

Feb. 2021 Meeting: Wald’s Contagious

Our February, 2021 meeting of LMCC took place on Wed. Feb. 24 at 5:30pm est via Zoom. We focused on Priscilla Wald’s Contagious: Cultures, Carriers, and the Outbreak Narrative, especially: Introduction Chapter 1: “Imagined Immunities: The Epidemiology of Belonging” (optional) … Continued